20 May 2021 - NPWJ News Digest on Environmental Justice & Human Rights

Articles

‘Amazônia must live on’: Photographer Sebastião Salgado returns home with his new book
Mongabay, 20 May 2021

Having photographed people and landscapes in more than 100 countries, Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado has returned to the country of his birth for his latest book, Amazônia, which is at once an ode to the beauty of the world’s largest rainforest and a cry for its preservation.

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EU lawmakers give final approval to bloc’s green transition fund
Euractiv, 19 May 2021

It will support the communities most affected by plans to shut down coal, peat and oil shale sectors, or other emissions-intensive industries, and replace them with low-carbon industries and jobs – a transformation seen as key to meeting the EU’s target to eliminate its net greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

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Settlers invading, deforesting Colombian national parks ‘at an unstoppable speed’
Mongabay, 19 May 2021

For the past several years, Colombia’s Tinigua National Natural Park has been racked by one of the highest levels of deforestation of any such protected area in the country. According to official data from the Institute of Hydrology, Meteorology and Environmental Studies (Ideam),  Tinigua lost 6,527 hectares (16,129 acres) of forest in 2019, followed by Sierra de La Macarena National Natural Park with 2,173 hectares (5,370 acres), Serranía del Chiribiquete National Natural Park with 820 hectares (2,026 acres) and Paramillo National Natural Park with 806 hectares (1,992 acres).

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Going Green, or Greenwashing? A Proposed Climate Law Divides France.
The New York Times, 19 May 2021

Less meat in French cafeterias. Bans on short-distance flights. Gas heaters on cafe terraces would be outlawed. As President Emmanuel Macron moves to make France a global champion in the fight against climate change, a wide-ranging environmental bill passed by the French National Assembly this month promises to change the way the French live, work and consume.

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U.K. Is Pushing for G-7 to Adopt Mandatory Climate Reporting
Bloomberg, 19 May 2021

U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak is pushing the Group of Seven economies to impose mandatory reporting of environmental risks on their big companies, people familiar with the matter said. Under the proposals, the biggest companies would report annually on their exposure to risks and opportunities presented by climate change.

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Food giants accused of links to illegal Amazon deforestation
The Guardian, 19 May 2021

Three of the world’s biggest food businesses have been accused of buying soya from a farmer linked to illegal deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Cargill, Bunge and Cofco sourced soya beans from the Chinese-owned Fiagril and the multinational Aliança Agrícola do Cerrado, both of which have allegedly been supplied by a farmer fined and sanctioned multiple times after destroying swathes of rainforest, according to a new investigation.

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Climate change boosted Hurricane Sandy’s damage by $8 billion, study finds
The Washington Post, 19 May 2021

A study published Tuesday in Nature finds that climate change was responsible for at least $8 billion in monetary losses associated with Sandy. The authors found evidence that climate change made the storm’s surge, or rise in ocean water above normally dry land, more severe, increasing the amount of coastline inundation.

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‘Zombie’ fires in the Arctic are linked to climate change
National Geographic, 19 May 2021

In the far North, fire season usually doesn’t start until June, when snow has melted away and summer lightning storms sweep into the region. So scientist Sander Veraverbeke was confused when in May of 2016 he saw little flecks of fire on some satellite images from Alaska and the Northwest Territories.

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Venezuela’s Maduro Should Be Tried for Ecocide
Foreign Policy, 14 May 2021

It isn’t uncommon to hear charges of “genocide” leveled at the government of Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro due to the humanitarian disaster unfolding in his country in the last few years. But now, a growing chorus has begun to blame Venezuela’s leadership with the crime of “ecocide”—or the deliberate and negligent destruction of nature.

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