NPWJ in the news

After 13 years of war, Iraq’s minorities on verge of disappearing, rights groups warn
Daily Star / Reuters, 05 Jul 2016


Many of Iraq's minorities are on the verge of disappearance after 13 years of war, campaigners warned on Monday. "The impact on minorities has been catastrophic. Saddam was terrible; the situation since is worse. Tens of thousands of minorities have been killed and millions have fled for their lives," said Mark Lattimer, head of Minority Rights Group (MRG). Iraq's Christian population, which before 2003 numbered as many as 1.4 million, is now under 250,000, according to a report by MRG and other rights organisations.
Civil conflicts and sectarian tensions have engulfed the country since 2003 when a U.S.-led coalition toppled Saddam Hussein. In 2014 Islamic State militants declared a caliphate after capturing swathes of Iraq and Syria. Minorities including the Yazidi, Turkmen, Shabak, Christians and Kaka'i have been disproportionately affected by the recent violence, the report said. Tens of thousands have been murdered, maimed or abducted and many women and girls forced into marriage or sexual enslavement.
The report demands an end to impunity for crimes against minorities. It says planning should begin immediately for a post-Islamic State era to enable them to return to their homelands. It also calls for the protection of mass graves in areas captured from Islamic State and the deployment of forensic teams to investigate possible war crimes. The report, "No Way Home: Iraq's Minorities on the Verge of Disappearance", says Iraqi security forces and Kurdish peshmerga forces have also committed war crimes.
An estimated 3.4 million people are now uprooted inside Iraq. And as many as one in five displaced Iraqis interviewed by researchers felt they had no choice but to flee the country because of the lack of basic services and security. The authors warned that displacement could soar with an assault to retake Mosul from Islamic State - potentially uprooting another 1 million people and creating hundreds of thousands more refugees. The report on minorities is published by MRG, Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization, the Institute for International Law and Human Rights and No Peace Without Justice.

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Iraq’s Religious, Ethnic Minorities on Verge of Disappearing: Report
By Lucy Westcott, Newsweek, 05 Jul 2016


After more than a decade of war in Iraq, the country's religious and ethnic minority groups are on the verge of disappearing, according to a new report. The report documents how several thousand people belonging to minority communities in Iraq have been abducted, maimed or murdered since June 2014, when the Islamic State (ISIS) militant group took control of Mosul, Iraq.
Among them are unknown numbers of women and girls who have been raped or forced into marriage or sexual enslavement by ISIS fighters. Efforts to retake Mosul later this year could result in a total of a million people being displaced, warns the report published on Monday by Minority Rights Group International, the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization, Institute for International Law and Human Rights, and No Peace Without Justice.

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Iraq's minorities 'on verge of disappearance' - rights groups
By Emma Batha, Reuters, 04 Jul 2016


Many of Iraq's minorities are on the verge of disappearance after 13 years of war, campaigners warned on Monday.
"The impact on minorities has been catastrophic. Saddam was terrible; the situation since is worse. Tens of thousands of minorities have been killed and millions have fled for their lives," said Mark Lattimer, head of Minority Rights Group (MRG).
Iraq's Christian population, which before 2003 numbered as many as 1.4 million, is now under 250,000, according to a report by MRG and other rights organisations.
Civil conflicts and sectarian tensions have engulfed the country since 2003 when a U.S.-led coalition toppled Saddam Hussein. In 2014 Islamic State militants declared a caliphate after capturing swathes of Iraq and Syria. Minorities including the Yazidi, Turkmen, Shabak, Christians and Kaka'i have been disproportionately affected by the recent violence, the report said.
Tens of thousands have been murdered, maimed or abducted and many women and girls forced into marriage or sexual enslavement.
"One cannot say anything positive about Saddam - he was a genocidal dictator, but for many minorities the situation is now much worse," said co-author Lattimer. The Yazidis hit the headlines in mid-2014 when Islamic State militants attacked them in northwest Iraq, killing, capturing and enslaving thousands. The jihadist group has shown particular cruelty to the Yazidis, whom they regard as devil-worshippers. Most Yazidis, along with another minority called the Kaka'i, have been forced from their traditional lands. Also highlighted, is the plight of the Shi'ite Turkmen and Shabak communities who have been driven south.
MASS GRAVES
The report demands an end to impunity for crimes against minorities. It says planning should begin immediately for a post-Islamic State era to enable them to return to their homelands. It also calls for the protection of mass graves in areas captured from Islamic State and the deployment of forensic teams to investigate possible war crimes. The report, "No Way Home: Iraq's Minorities on the Verge of Disappearance", says Iraqi security forces and Kurdish peshmerga forces have also committed war crimes.
An estimated 3.4 million people are now uprooted inside Iraq. And as many as one in five displaced Iraqis interviewed by researchers felt they had no choice but to flee the country because of the lack of basic services and security.
The authors warned that displacement could soar with an assault to retake Mosul from Islamic State - potentially uprooting another 1 million people and creating hundreds of thousands more refugees.
Lattimer said the upcoming Chilcot report on Britain's role in the Iraq war should reflect the devastating long-term consequences for Iraqi society. The long-delayed report is to be released on Wednesday. "Chilcot is expected to criticise 'post-invasion planning' but the U.K. government's biggest - and continuing - mistake has been to support successive Iraqi governments since 2003 in a sectarian war that has cost tens of thousands of civilian lives on both sides," Lattimer said.
The report on minorities is published by MRG, Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization, the Institute for International Law and Human Rights and No Peace Without Justice.

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REVEALED: The city where ISIS now occupies all churches as Christians face wipe out
By Tom Batchelor, Express, 04 Jul 2016


Christians and other religious minorities face the prospect of annihilation in Iraq after more than a decade of sectarian bloodshed and the rise of Islamic State, leading charities have warned.
Crazed jihadis have looted, destroyed, or occupied all 45 churches in the city of Mosul, while targeting scores more across the country. Large numbers of Iraq's other ethnic and religious minorities have also been murdered, maimed or abducted, while unknown numbers of women and girls have been forced into marriage or sexual enslavement since the fall of Mosul to ISIS in June 2014. The shocking reality for Christians living in Iraq was revealed in a report, No Way Home: Iraq's Minorities on the Verge of Disappearance. It said there was a "large exodus of Christians" from Iraq immediately after the US invasion as community members were targeted for their religious differences as well as their perceived ties to the West. Two successive wars in Iraq - the first by the British and Americans in 2003, and the second with ISIS a decade later - has seen the Christian population in Iraq tumble from 1.4million before 2003 to under 250,000 today.
The report describes the "sweeping scale of the destruction of houses, shrines and other institutions belonging to Christians", including dozens of houses that were blown up in Mosul by ISIS fanatics. The charities add: "Since the fall of Mosul, ISIS has destroyed, occupied, converted to mosques, reused as ISIS headquarters or shuttered all Christian institutions in Mosul. All 45 churches and monasteries inside Mosul are reportedly now occupied by ISIS, who have looted, burned and destroyed property, in addition to removing the building's crosses."
Those Christians who have chosen to stay have been subjected to punitive taxes by ISIS. Christian women have also been targeted in heinous crimes including sexual assaults and the rape of girls as young as 12. The charities which co-wrote the report include the Minority Rights Group International, the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organisation and Institute for International Law and Human Rights. They say ISIS fighters prefer younger women and girls as they are symbols of virginity and purity.
One Christian mother from Mosul who was interviewed for the study described being forced to 'marry' several ISIS militants who would rape and then 'divorce' her. She said: "We tried to fight them off, but in vain. They had their fun, and then they did it again. I was raped four times, the other girl three. On their way out, the men divorced us. Ten minutes later two more men, this time Iraqi, entered the room. We were married and raped again. That night I was married to eight different men and divorced eight times. Each man raped me three or four times."
Mark Lattimer, Minority Rights Group International's executive director, said: "Thirteen years of war have had devastating long-term consequences for Iraqi society. The impact on minorities has been catastrophic. Saddam was terrible; the situation since is worse. Tens of thousands of religious and ethnic minorities have been killed and millions have fled for their lives." Other minority religious and ethnic groups have also faced persecution. Most of those belonging to the Yazidi and Kaka'i communities have been forced from their homes and are now living as refugees either inside Iraq or abroad. Alison Smith, of No Peace Without Justice, added: "It's unthinkable that crimes of this magnitude and impact are being committed with total impunity. The Government of Iraq really needs to take urgent steps to provide redress to the victims - referring the situation to the International Criminal Court would be a good start."

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Iraq's Minorities 'On Verge of Disappearance,' Rights Group Warns
Emma Batha, Haaretz / Reuters, 04 Jul 2016


Minorities including the Yazidi, Turkmen, Shabak, Christians and Kaka'i have been disproportionately affected by the recent violence.
Many of Iraq's minorities are on the verge of disappearance after 13 years of war, campaigners warned on Monday. "The impact on minorities has been catastrophic. Saddam was terrible; the situation since is worse. Tens of thousands of minorities have been killed and millions have fled for their lives," said Mark Lattimer, head of Minority Rights Group (MRG). Iraq's Christian population, which before 2003 numbered as many as 1.4 million, is now under 250,000, according to a report by MRG and other rights organisations.
Civil conflicts and sectarian tensions have engulfed the country since 2003 when a U.S.-led coalition toppled Saddam Hussein. In 2014 Islamic State militants declared a caliphate after capturing swathes of Iraq and Syria. Minorities including the Yazidi, Turkmen, Shabak, Christians and Kaka'i have been disproportionately affected by the recent violence, the report said. Tens of thousands have been murdered, maimed or abducted and many women and girls forced into marriage or sexual enslavement.
The report demands an end to impunity for crimes against minorities. It says planning should begin immediately for a post-Islamic State era to enable them to return to their homelands. It also calls for the protection of mass graves in areas captured from Islamic State and the deployment of forensic teams to investigate possible war crimes. The report, "No Way Home: Iraq's Minorities on the Verge of Disappearance", says Iraqi security forces and Kurdish peshmerga forces have also committed war crimes.
An estimated 3.4 million people are now uprooted inside Iraq. And as many as one in five displaced Iraqis interviewed by researchers felt they had no choice but to flee the country because of the lack of basic services and security. The authors warned that displacement could soar with an assault to retake Mosul from Islamic State - potentially uprooting another 1 million people and creating hundreds of thousands more refugees.
The report on minorities is published by MRG, Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization, the Institute for International Law and Human Rights and No Peace Without Justice

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West Africa: Ecowas Member Communities and Experts On Female Genital Mutilation Lay Strategies for the Way Forward
The Pont (Banjul) / AllAfrica, 15 Jun 2016

Government representatives and experts recently concluded a high level consultation to share experiences on strategies used in the campaign to end Female Genital Mutilation in the Senegalese capital Dakar.
The meeting organized by No Peace Without Justice in partnership with the Senegalese Ministry of Women, Family and Children's Affairs, Inter Africa Committee on Traditional Practices, and other partners supported by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation / Italian Agency for Development Cooperation.
The consultation provided opportunities for the high level meeting to review the implementation of the United Nations General Assembly Resolution 69/150 on "intensifying global efforts and sharing good practices to effectively eliminate female genital mutilation" and the fight to eliminate FGM in the ECOWAS countries and Mauritania. The meeting focussed on the particular approaches undertaken in the effective implementation of the existing laws banning FGM at the national level and cooperation to combat trans-border practice of FGM in West Africa.
The high level meeting brought together delegates of the Ministries of Women, Health and Justice of ECOWAS countries and Mauritania, as well as Civil Society participants amongst them the Executive Director of GAMCOTRAP, Dr. Isatou Touray. Speaking as an expert on FGM from The Gambia, Dr. Touray noted that the meeting aimed to revitalize engagement and dialogue between institutions and civil society, as well as contribute to strengthening the political and legislative legal framework to combat FGM as a form of violence against women. The meeting ended with a communiqué to support the total elimination of FGM.
On a separate mission, the Executive Director of GAMCOTRAP is attended an International Conference on Human Rights Approach to Ending Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in One Generation in Geneva, Switzerland. The two days conference is organized by the Inter-African Committee on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children (IAC), with the objective of showcasing best practices, achievements and progress while highlighting challenges and barriers with concrete action points for moving forward the agenda to end Female Genital Mutilation in One Generation.

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NPWJ Firmly Condemns Sentence Issued against Sheikh Ali Salman
Bahrain Mirror, 01 Jun 2016


No Peace Without Justice (NPWJ) condemned "the astonishing increase in the sentence of the leader of the main Bahraini opposition party, Sheikh Ali Salman to nine years," expressing its undiminished solidarity and support for Salman, who "has consistently called for peaceful protest, condemned all forms of violence - including during the speech that formed the basis of his trial - and advocated for a fair and just democratic political system in Bahrain through the establishment of a genuine constitutional monarchy."
The organization added in its statement on Monday (May 30, 2016): "Today's shocking ruling, grounded on purely politically-motivated charges, clearly demonstrates Bahraini authorities' unabated determination to criminalise free speech and suppress any peaceful dissent."
Niccolò Figà-Talamanca, Secretary-General of No Peace Without Justice, said that "it also further confirms the fallacy of the Bahraini regime's claims to advance democratic reform, rule of law and respect of human rights in the country."
"This is also a highly dangerous move that can only set the country further along the dangerous path of political turmoil and disunity. In the face of what is rapidly becoming the realisation of the worst possible scenario for Bahrain, the response of the international community cannot continue to be weak and deaf to the plight of Bahraini citizens. So far, the Bahraini authorities have used this approach as a green light to persevere in their repressive and retaliatory practices against peaceful opposition leaders and human rights advocates," he further stated.
NPWJ urged the international community and the European Union (EU) to take immediate action and unequivocally condemn this latest blow to freedom of expression in Bahrain.
Failure to do so is, in reality, siding with tyranny and repression.
The organization further noted that "a truly democratic transition in Bahrain will be achieved only if all those who are committed to peaceful and nonviolent dialogue are able to contribute fully to the political process without fear of reprisals."
At the end of its statement, No Peace Without Justice demanded the international community "to support this process rather than turning a blind eye to another move clearly designed to thwart democracy and human rights" (Arabic Version).

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Bangladesh's Motiur Rahman Nizami to hang
By Aljazeera/ Reuters, 05 May 2016

 A final appeal by the leader of Bangladesh's largest Islamist party against a death penalty for involvement in a 1971 liberation war has been rejected, his lawyers said, clearing the way for his hanging. The Supreme Court on Thursday passed the order against Motiur Rahman Nizami, head of the banned Jamaat-e-Islami party, which opposed the war for independence from Pakistan. The 73-year-old, who was also given life sentences for four other war crimes convictions, has exhausted all legal options and only a presidential pardon can now save him. Jamaat called a nationwide strike for Sunday in a response published on its website.
The Supreme Court in January upheld the death penalty for Nizami on convictions of genocide, rape and orchestrating the massacre of top intellectuals during the war. The Jamaat leader, in jail since 2010, was originally handed the death sentence by a war crimes tribunal in 2014. Bangladeshi authorities say about three million people were killed and more than 200,000 women raped during the conflict. The former East Pakistan broke away to become Bangladesh after the war. The tribunal has sparked violence and drawn fierce criticism from opposition politicians, including Jamaat-e-Islami, who say it is victimising Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina's opponents. No Peace Without Justice, a rights group based in Italy, has called the tribunal "a weapon of politically influenced revenge whose real aim is to target the political opposition". The government denies that. A senior Jamaat-e-Islami leader living outside Bangladesh told Al Jazeera in a reaction that the news of the verdict was "devastating". "This is the not the first death sentence confirmed by the judicial system and quite a distinguished line of others are waiting after him," said the party official, who wished to remain anonymous. "Not only that; at least 20,000 Jamaat workers are in prison without any charges. "Police have raided and arrested many people attending religious or Quran classes. Even the international community rejects the allegations and also the court process."

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Bangladesh court rejects Islamist leader's final death sentence appeal
By Aljazeera/ Reuters, 05 May 2016

 Bangladesh’s supreme court has rejected a final appeal by the leader of the top Islamist party against a death sentence for atrocities committed during the 1971 war of independence, lawyers say, meaning he could be hanged at any time. The supreme court in January upheld the death penalty for Motiur Rahman Nizami, head of the Jamaat-e-Islami party, for genocide, rape and orchestrating the massacre of top intellectuals during the 1971 war. Nizami, 73, a former legislator and minister under Khaleda Zia when she was prime minister, has been in jail since 2010, when he was charged with war crimes by a tribunal set up by the current prime minister, Sheikh Hasina, that year. The war crimes tribunal has sparked violence and drawn criticism from opposition politicians, including leaders of Jamaat-e-Islami, that it is victimising Hasina’s political opponents. “All the legal battles are over,” Nizami’s lawyer, Khandaker Mahbub Hossain, told reporters on Thursday. “Now it is up to him whether he will seek clemency from the president or not.” Hundreds of people flooded the streets of the capital, Dhaka, to cheer the verdict, but there has been no report of violence, although Jamaat called a nationwide strike for Sunday in protest. Authorities have deployed additional security forces in Dhaka and elsewhere as similar previous judgments triggered violence that killed around 200, mainly Jamaat activists and police. No Peace Without Justice, a non-profit body based in Italy, has called the tribunal’s proceedings “a weapon of politically influenced revenge whose real aim is to target the political opposition”. The government denies the accusations. The verdict comes as the Muslim-majority nation suffers a surge in militant violence in which atheist bloggers, academics, religious minorities and foreign aid workers have been killed. In the last month alone, five people, including a university teacher, two gay activists and a Hindu have been hacked to death by suspected Islamist militants.

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Bangladesh's Motiur Rahman Nizami to hang
Al Jazeera / Reuters, 05 May 2016


A final appeal by the leader of Bangladesh's largest Islamist party against a death penalty for involvement in a 1971 liberation war has been rejected, his lawyers said, clearing the way for his hanging.
The Supreme Court on Thursday passed the order against Motiur Rahman Nizami, head of the banned Jamaat-e-Islami party, which opposed the war for independence from Pakistan. The 73-year-old, who was also given life sentences for four other war crimes convictions, has exhausted all legal options and only a presidential pardon can now save him. Jamaat called a nationwide strike for Sunday in a response published on its website.
The Supreme Court in January upheld the death penalty for Nizami on convictions of genocide, rape and orchestrating the massacre of top intellectuals during the war. The Jamaat leader, in jail since 2010, was originally handed the death sentence by a war crimes tribunal in 2014. Bangladeshi authorities say about three million people were killed and more than 200,000 women raped during the conflict. The former East Pakistan broke away to become Bangladesh after the war. The tribunal has sparked violence and drawn fierce criticism from opposition politicians, including Jamaat-e-Islami, who say it is victimising Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina's opponents.
No Peace Without Justice, a rights group based in Italy, has called the tribunal "a weapon of politically influenced revenge whose real aim is to target the political opposition". The government denies that. A senior Jamaat-e-Islami leader living outside Bangladesh told Al Jazeera in a reaction that the news of the verdict was "devastating". "This is the not the first death sentence confirmed by the judicial system and quite a distinguished line of others are waiting after him," said the party official, who wished to remain anonymous. "Not only that; at least 20,000 Jamaat workers are in prison without any charges. "Police have raided and arrested many people attending religious or Quran classes. Even the international community rejects the allegations and also the court process."
International legal experts expressed concern over the lack of an appropriate accountability mechanism in Bangladesh and called on the United Nations to support an internationally supervised mechanism. A joint statement, signed by six legal experts, said: "It is with deep regret that the current practice of the Bangladesh International Crimes Tribunal (BICT) is failing to uphold the highest international standards required in such cases, in particular where there is the imposition of the death penalty." The experts, affiliated with a wide range of institutions, from the International Criminal Court to the US State Department, said that the central issue is that "any judicial mechanism, post conflict or otherwise, is about the pursuit of justice and accountability. It is not about revenge or political retribution." "Sadly, the BICT has shown itself to be merely that, a politicised process that fails to uphold the very standards it was set up to address," the statement read.  The nation has seen a surge of violence in which atheist bloggers, academics, religious minorities and foreign aid workers have been killed. In the last month alone, five people, including a university teacher, two gay activists and a Hindu, have been hacked to death by suspected armed groups. The government has blamed that violence on Jamaat and other opposition groups. Jamaat denies any involvement.  Four opposition politicians, including three Jamaat leaders, have been executed since late 2013 after tribunal convictions.

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Bangladesh court rejects Islamist leader's final death sentence appeal
The Guardian / Reuters, 05 May 2016


Bangladesh’s supreme court has rejected a final appeal by the leader of the top Islamist party against a death sentence for atrocities committed during the 1971 war of independence, lawyers say, meaning he could be hanged at any time. The supreme court in January upheld the death penalty for Motiur Rahman Nizami, head of the Jamaat-e-Islami party, for genocide, rape and orchestrating the massacre of top intellectuals during the 1971 war. Nizami, 73, a former legislator and minister under Khaleda Zia when she was prime minister, has been in jail since 2010, when he was charged with war crimes by a tribunal set up by the current prime minister, Sheikh Hasina, that year.
The war crimes tribunal has sparked violence and drawn criticism from opposition politicians, including leaders of Jamaat-e-Islami, that it is victimising Hasina’s political opponents. “All the legal battles are over,” Nizami’s lawyer, Khandaker Mahbub Hossain, told reporters on Thursday. “Now it is up to him whether he will seek clemency from the president or not.” Hundreds of people flooded the streets of the capital, Dhaka, to cheer the verdict, but there has been no report of violence, although Jamaat called a nationwide strike for Sunday in protest. Authorities have deployed additional security forces in Dhaka and elsewhere as similar previous judgments triggered violence that killed around 200, mainly Jamaat activists and police.
No Peace Without Justice, a non-profit body based in Italy, has called the tribunal’s proceedings “a weapon of politically influenced revenge whose real aim is to target the political opposition”. The government denies the accusations. The verdict comes as the Muslim-majority nation suffers a surge in militant violence in which atheist bloggers, academics, religious minorities and foreign aid workers have been killed. In the last month alone, five people, including a university teacher, two gay activists and a Hindu have been hacked to death by suspected Islamist militants. The government has blamed the increase in Islamist violence on Jamaat-e-Islami, but the group denies any link to the attacks. Four opposition politicians, including three Jamaat-e-Islami leaders, have been convicted by the war crimes tribunal and executed since late 2013. About 3 million people were killed, official figures show, and thousands of women were raped, during the nine-month war, in which some factions, including the Jamaat-e-Islami, opposed the break from what was then called West Pakistan. But the party denies that its leaders committed any atrocities.

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Forum sous-régional ministériel au Sénégal pour mettre fin aux MGF
CCTV, Afrique Infos, 29 Apr 2016

Les Nations unies et les organisations des droits de l'homme appellent à un arrêt complet de la pratique néfaste de la mutilation génitale féminine. Un forum sous-régional ministériel vient de se conclure à Dakar, au Sénégal. Ce forum vise à favoriser l'application de la résolution de l'Assemblée générale des Nations unies pour une interdiction mondiale de la MGF.
Des représentants du gouvernement de la région du Sahel se sont rassemblés aux deux jours de conférence dans la capitale sénégalaise.
ALVILDA JABLONKO, Directrice de No peace without justice: "Selon les derniers rapports des Nations unies, la mutilation génitale féminine et l'excision ne montrent aucun signe de ralentissement dans certains pays. Peu de poursuites ont lieu dans les pays afin de sanctionner et de réprimer la poursuite de cette pratique, même si la plupart des gouvernements ont adopté des lois et des mécanismes de protection assez puissants."
MARIAM LAMIZANA, Présidente du comité de l'interafrique : "Il y a trois parties dans notre stratégie principale. La prévention, la protection et le soin. Le soin est administré aux personnes souffant physiquement. Par conséquent, lors de notre campagne de sensibilisation, nous déclarons qu'il existe des possibilités de soigner les personnes qui vivent avec les effets secondaires de l'excision. Dans le cadre du soin, au Burkina Faso, grâce au comité interafricain et à l'UEMOA, nous avons formé un certain nombre de médecins dans les techniques de réparation des effets secondaires de l'excision. Dans ce domaine, les soins sont gratuits." Des ministres, des hauts-représentants du gouvernement, des parlementaires et des militants des droits civils du Sénégal et de 14 autres pays de la région dont le Libéria, où ces pratiques sont toujours légales, ont participé à ce forum.
SIANE ABDUL-BAKI, Ministre adjointe, Ministère social du genre et des enfants : "Au Libéria, parce que la pratique de la MGF est profondément ancréée dans notre culture et tradition, l'une des plus importantes stratégies est de travailler avec les personnes traditionnelles, de changer la perception, l'attitude et de sensibiliser les gens autour de la MGF." Certaines agences des Nations unies ont prévenu que le taux global de progrès pour mettre fin à la mutilation génitale féminine ne suffit pas par rapport à la croissance démographique. Selon les représentants, le nombre de jeunes filles et de femmes sujettes à cette pratique augmentera de manière significative d'ici les 15 prochaines années si la tendance actuelle continue. 

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Forum ministériel sous-régional au Sénégal pour mettre fin aux MGF
CCTV / Afrique Infos, 29 Apr 2016


Les Nations unies et les organisations des droits de l'homme appellent à un arrêt complet de la pratique néfaste de la mutilation génitale féminine. Un forum sous-régional ministériel vient de se conclure à Dakar, au Sénégal. Ce forum vise à favoriser l'application de la résolution de l'Assemblée générale des Nations unies pour une interdiction mondiale de la MGF.
Des représentants du gouvernement de la région du Sahel se sont rassemblés aux deux jours de conférence dans la capitale sénégalaise.
ALVILDA JABLONKO, Directrice de No peace without justice: "Selon les derniers rapports des Nations unies, la mutilation génitale féminine et l'excision ne montrent aucun signe de ralentissement dans certains pays. Peu de poursuites ont lieu dans les pays afin de sanctionner et de réprimer la poursuite de cette pratique, même si la plupart des gouvernements ont adopté des lois et des mécanismes de protection assez puissants."
MARIAM LAMIZANA, Présidente du CI-AF : "Il y a trois parties dans notre stratégie principale. La prévention, la protection et le soin. Le soin est administré aux personnes souffant physiquement. Par conséquent, lors de notre campagne de sensibilisation, nous déclarons qu'il existe des possibilités de soigner les personnes qui vivent avec les effets secondaires de l'excision. Dans le cadre du soin, au Burkina Faso, grâce au comité interafricain et à l'UEMOA, nous avons formé un certain nombre de médecins dans les techniques de réparation des effets secondaires de l'excision. Dans ce domaine, les soins sont gratuits."
 Des ministres, des hauts-représentants du gouvernement, des parlementaires et des militants des droits civils du Sénégal et de 14 autres pays de la région dont le Libéria, où ces pratiques sont toujours légales, ont participé à ce forum.
SIANE ABDUL-BAKI, Ministre adjointe, Ministère social du genre et des enfants : "Au Libéria, parce que la pratique de la MGF est profondément ancréée dans notre culture et tradition, l'une des plus importantes stratégies est de travailler avec les personnes traditionnelles, de changer la perception, l'attitude et de sensibiliser les gens autour de la MGF."
Certaines agences des Nations unies ont prévenu que le taux global de progrès pour mettre fin à la mutilation génitale féminine ne suffit pas par rapport à la croissance démographique. Selon les représentants, le nombre de jeunes filles et de femmes sujettes à cette pratique augmentera de manière significative d'ici les 15 prochaines années si la tendance actuelle continue.

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Sénégal : Plaidoyer pour la criminalisation des mutilations génitales féminines
APA / Star Africa, 27 Apr 2016


 
Les participants à la Consultation ministérielle sous–régionale sur la mise en œuvre de la résolution 69/150 de l’Organisation des Nations Unies interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines, ont, au terme de leurs travaux, recommandé de ‘’reconnaitre et promouvoir le rôle essentiel de la législation et d’autres cadres normatifs mettant en œuvre l’interdiction des MGF à travers la prohibition et la criminalisation de cette violation des droits humains ».
La Déclaration finale de la Consultation remise dont copie a été distribuée à la presse, tient à assurer que l’interdiction des MGF se reflète dans tous les domaines et a tous les niveaux, y compris dans les codes de conduite professionnels, les normes d’éducation, la formation continue et l’évaluation professionnelle.
Le texte note que ceci devrait permettre de maximiser le potentiel de l’interdiction des MG, d’assurer une réponse coordonnée et globale répondant aux besoins des victimes.
Ils ont aussi, préconisé d’assurer des allocations budgétaires suffisantes au niveau local, national, sous régional, régional, et international destinées aux victimes de cette violation des droits humains en répondant également à leurs besoins médicaux et psychosociaux, ainsi que juridiques.
Les participants ont, en outre, appelé à la mise en place d’un mécanisme de coordination et de partage d’informations entre gouvernements, parlements et société civile dans la sous- région, afin d’harmoniser la législation, les cadres normatifs, et les politiques nationales, pour prévenir, répondre et permettre l’évaluation des activités transfrontalières concernant les MGF.
Cette rencontre est organisée par le ministère sénégalais de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfance et No Peace Without Justice, en partenariat avec le Comité inter-africain sur les pratiques traditionnelles ayant pour effet sur la santé des femmes et des enfants (Ciaf). 
La Résolution 69/150 de l’ONU interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines dans le monde adoptée grâce aux efforts et à la volonté des Etats africains, est devenue un point de référence crucial de la lutte contre globale contre cette violation des droits humains et pour assurer la protection des victimes et la poursuite des responsables.
La consultation régionale a réuni durant deux jours, entre autres participants, des ministres et représentants gouvernementaux, des parlementaires et des activistes du Sénégal et de 14 pays ainsi que des représentants des agences des Nations Unies et d’autres organisations internationales et des représentations diplomatiques.

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Faible sanction sur l’excision au Sénégal. Seuls huit jugements en 17 ans
Mouhamadou BA, Rewmi, 27 Apr 2016


Malgré l’existence d’une loi interdisant l’excision, depuis 1999, au Sénégal, seuls huit cas ont été jugés en 17 ans.
Comme toutes les traditions, l’excision qui consiste en l’amputation d’une partie du sexe de la femme à la vie dure. L’État du Sénégal, tout en continuant d’user de stratégies de persuasion, d’éducation et de sensibilisation, s’est d’abord résolument engagé à user de l’arme juridique pour mettre un terme à cette pratique. Mais la loi sur l’excision souffre d’une application faible par rapport à l’ampleur de la pratique et aux résistances enregistrées, selon un rapport présenté, hier, par le ministère de la Famille. Après 17 ans de lutte, seuls 08 cas ont été portés au tribunal, lit-on dans le même rapport présenté  en marge d’une consultation ministérielle sous-régionale sur la mise en œuvre de la Résolution 69/150 de l’Organisation des Nations-Unies interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines. Selon la même source, la  loi est appliquée avec souplesse, car les peines prononcées sont faibles. Selon toujours le rapport, il y a l’intervention des lobbies religieux pour obtenir la clémence du tribunal. Même des responsables d’ONG impliqués dans la lutte contre les mutilations génitales féminines (MGF) sont intervenus « pour solliciter plus de compréhension de la part du tribunal et sa clémence ».
Aussi, les réponses particulières des communautés villageoises renvoient-elles, aux spécificités sociologiques de ces milieux faits de solidarité et de capacité de dissimulation. D’où l’absence de dénonciation. Jeunes et femmes se sont contentés de dire, après un temps perceptible d’hésitation et d’intense réflexion, qu’ayant abandonné l’excision, ils n’ont connaissance d’aucune personne ayant pratiqué l’excision dans leurs villages, selon le rapport. Caractérisant un tel unanimisme, le même rapport  parle  de « complicité communautaire », et d’une « omerta communautaire ». Alors que la pratique continue,  les populations savent, mais refusent de dénoncer. Ces réponses montrent à quel point il peut être difficile de se faire une idée précise du nombre de filles excisées et de déterminer la prévalence de l’excision dans les communautés, dit le rapport.  Qui précise qu’au Sénégal, 25% des filles et de femmes sont actuellement touchées. Environ 13% des filles de moins de 14 ans restent excisées, chaque année, en moyenne autour de l’âge de 6-7 ans.
À signaler que la consultation régionale réunit, entre autres participants, des ministres et représentants gouvernementaux, des parlementaires et des activistes du Sénégal et de 14 pays ainsi que des représentants des agences des Nations-Unies et d’autres organisations internationales et des représentations diplomatiques.

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Pour rayer l'excision de la carte: Une Consultation ministérielle sous régionale s'ouvre à Dakar
Ieral, 26 Apr 2016


Trouver les voies et moyens pour éradiquer le phénomène de la mutilation génitale féminine, c’est ce qui motive une rencontre dénommée Consultation sous régionale sur la mise en œuvre de la Résolution onusienne 69/150 interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines. Cette rencontre de deux jours, qui regroupe des experts et des ministres des pays membres de la Cedeao, mais aussi d’autres pays, sera une occasion de discuter sur tout ce qui a été fait pendant 32 ans pour éradiquer ce fléau qui touche les jeunes filles.
Le ministre en charge de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfance est revenu sur l’article 4 de la résolution 69/150 qui, selon elle, «exhorte les Etats à condamner, entre autres, les mutilations génitales féminines, qu’elles soient ou non pratiquées dans un centre médical, à prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour préserver les filles et les femmes de telles pratiques, en promulguant et en faisant appliquer une loi, une législation interdisant cette forme de violence et à mettre fin à l’impunité», a dit Mariama Sarr. « Nos différents pays sont engagés à l’application de telles mesures », a-t-elle ajouté. Prenant le cas spécifique du Sénégal, Mme Sarr fera remarquer qu’une loi pénalisant les mutilations génitales féminines y est en vigueur depuis le 29 janvier 1999. « En plus de ce dispositif législatif et pénal, différents mécanismes basés sur l’approche droits humains et les normes sociales, la responsabilisation des femmes et des jeunes, le développement formalisé du mouvement d’abandon de l’excision, le dialogue public, inclusif au sein des communautés, la mobilisation des élus locaux, des décideurs sociaux, pour ne citer que ces exemples, ont concouru à faire reculer la pratique de l’excision », a-t-elle indiqué avant de signifier que « l’engagement international autour de la lutte contre les mutilation génitales féminines à travers la résolution 69/150 est une force de lance, mais, il faut reconnaître que les dynamiques régionales et sous régionales constituent le fer de lance ». Mme Sarr d’espérer que cette rencontre soit « un espace d’échanges et de propositions qui vont, certainement, ouvrir de nouvelles orientations en phase avec cette importante résolution onusienne ».

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Ouverture à Dakar d’une conférence sous-régionale contre les mutilations génitales
APA / Star Africa, 26 Apr 2016


Une conférence sous-régionale sur la mise en œuvre de la Résolution 69/150 de l’Organisation des Nations Unies interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines s’est ouverte mardi à Dakar pour s’achever mercredi, a constaté APA.
Cette rencontre est organisée par le ministère sénégalais de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfance et No Peace Without Justice, en partenariat avec le Comité inter-africain sur les pratiques traditionnelles ayant pour effet sur la santé des femmes et des enfants (Ciaf).
Selon ses organisateurs, la conférence vise à encourager la mise en œuvre de la Résolution 69/150 de l’ONU interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines dans le monde.
La Résolution 69/150 de l’ONU interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines dans le monde adoptée grâce aux efforts et à la volonté des Etats africains, est devenue un point de référence crucial de la lutte contre globale contre cette violation des droits humains et pour assurer la protection des victimes et la poursuite des responsables.
La consultation régionale réunit, entre autres participants, des ministres et représentants gouvernementaux, des parlementaires et des activistes du Sénégal et de 14 pays ainsi que des représentants des agences des Nations Unies et d’autres organisations internationales et des représentations diplomatiques.

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Excision: Seuls 8 cas jugés en 17 ans au Sénégal
Sen360, 26 Apr 2016


En dépit de l'existence d'une loi interdisant l'excision depuis 1999 au Sénégal, seuls huit cas ont été jugés en 17 ans pour pratique de l'excision dans le pays.
«Au Sénégal, la loi contre l'excision peine à  s'appliquer et on ne compte que 8 cas jugés pour pratique de l'excision sur une période de 17 ans», selon un document remis à  la presse par le ministère sénégalais de la Femme, de la Famille et de l'Enfance et No Peace without justice en marge d'une consultation ministérielle sous-régionale sur la mise en ?uvre de la Résolution 69/150 de l'Organisation des Nations Unies interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines.
Ils organisent cette rencontre, en partenariat avec le Comité inter-africain sur les pratiques traditionnelles ayant pour effet sur la santé des femmes et des enfants (Ciaf).
Selon ses organisateurs, la conférence vise à  encourager la mise en ?uvre de la Résolution 69/150 de l'ONU interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines dans le monde. La Résolution 69/150 de l'ONU interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines dans le monde adoptée grâce aux efforts et à  la volonté des Etats africains, est devenue un point de référence crucial de la lutte contre globale contre cette violation des droits humains et pour assurer la protection des victimes et la poursuite des responsables.
Au Sénégal, 25% des filles et de femmes sont actuellement touchées. Environ 13% des filles de moins de 14 ans restent excisées chaque année, en moyenne autour de l'âge de 6-7 ans. «La lutte contre les mutilations génitales demeure une priorité absolue pour le Sénégal. Nous devons redoubler d'efforts à  la fois en tant que pays individuel et conjointement avec d'autres pays de la sous-région afin de mettre fin ç cette pratique», a indiqué Mariama Sarr, ministre de la Femme.

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Seuls huit jugements en 17 ans pour pratique de l'excision au Sénégal
APA / Star Africa, 26 Apr 2016


Malgré l’existence d’une loi interdisant l’excision depuis 1999 au Sénégal, seuls huit cas ont été jugés en 17 ans pour sévir contre cette pratique, a appris APA mardi à Dakar, de sources officielles.
« Au Sénégal, la loi contre l’excision peine à s’appliquer et on ne compte que 8 cas jugés pour pratique de l’excision sur une période de 17 ans», relève un document remis à la presse par le ministère sénégalais de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfance et l’ONG No Peace Without Justice en marge d’une consultation ministérielle sous-régionale sur la mise en œuvre de la Résolution 69/150 de l’Organisation des Nations Unies interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines.
Ils organisent cette rencontre en partenariat avec le Comité inter-africain sur les pratiques traditionnelles ayant pour effet sur la santé des femmes et des enfants (CIAF). Selon ses organisateurs, la conférence vise à encourager la mise en œuvre de la Résolution 69/150 de l’ONU interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines dans le monde. La Résolution 69/150 de l’ONU interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines dans le monde adoptée grâce aux efforts et à la volonté des Etats africains, est devenue un point de référence crucial de la lutte globale contre cette violation des droits humains et pour assurer la protection des victimes et la poursuite des responsables.
Au Sénégal, 25% des filles et des femmes sont actuellement touchées et environ 13% des filles de moins de 14 ans restent excisées chaque année, en moyenne autour de l’âge de 6-7 ans.
« La lutte contre les mutilations génitales demeure une priorité absolue pour le Sénégal. Nous devons redoubler d’efforts à la fois en tant que pays individuel et conjointement avec d’autres pays de la sous-région afin de mettre fin à cette pratique», a indiqué Mariama Sarr, ministre de la Femme. Toutefois, elle a souligné qu’une victoire a été enregistrée dans le combat contre les mutilations génitales, surtout que l’éradication se heurte à de fortes résistances socio-culturelles. «Aujourd’hui, l’éducation aux droits humains et la communication ainsi que l’implication des leaders d’opinion, entre autres, ont permis d’engranger d’importants résultats», a dit Mme Sarr.

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Dakar hôte d’une consultation sous-régionale sur l’élimination des mutilations génitales
Ligne Directe (Sénégal), 26 Apr 2016


La capitale sénégalais accueille, ces 26 et 27 avril une consultation sous-régionale sur la mise en œuvre de la Résolution 69/150 de l’Organisation des Nations Unies interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines.
 Sous l’égide du ministère sénégalais de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfance et No Peace Without Justice, en partenariat avec le Comité inter-africain sur les pratiques traditionnelles ayant pour effet sur la santé des femmes et des enfants (Ciaf), la rencontre réunit, entre autres participants, des ministres et représentants gouvernementaux, des parlementaires et des activistes du Sénégal et de 14 pays ainsi que des représentants des agences des Nations Unies et d’autres organisations internationales et des représentations diplomatiques.
 Selon ses organisateurs, la conférence vise à encourager la mise en œuvre de la Résolution 69/150 de l’ONU interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines dans le monde.
 La Résolution 69/150 de l’ONU interdisant les mutilations génitales féminines dans le monde adoptée grâce aux efforts et à la volonté des Etats africains, est devenue un point de référence crucial de la lutte contre globale contre cette violation des droits humains et pour assurer la protection des victimes et la poursuite des responsables.

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Conférence de Presse (extrait) sur la Conférence Ministérielle sous-régionale de Dakar
Senego TV, 26 Apr 2016

 
 
 
Intervenants: Mariama Sarr (Ministre de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfance du Sénégal), Niccolò Figà Talamanca (Secrétaire Général de NPWJ), Mariam Lamizana (CI-AF), Khady Koita (La Palabre).

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Brussels Conference Launches Book Revealing Shocking Facts about Discrimination against Shia in Bahrain
AhlulBayt News Agency, 24 Apr 2016


 
The organizing committee of the international two-day conference on "Persecution of Shia in Bahrain", organized by Salam for Democracy and Human Rights and No Peace without Justice, launched a book revealing human rights violations practiced against the Shia in Bahrain. The conference kicked off on Saturday (April 22, 2016). Parliamentary institutions and bodies, organizations, law experts and think tanks took part in this conference held in the Belgian capital, Brussels.
The published book on Shia Persecution in Bahrain compiles shocking figures and facts disclosing the state of religious discrimination and persecution in Bahrain. The total number of religious freedom violations committed in the country reached 578, and 38 mosques were demolished. The book also tackles the arbitrary dismissal of employees from the private and public sectors that reached 4539 dismissals over politically-motivated reasons. It further revealed that Shia representation in the judiciary authority is only 12%, meanwhile, the report on religious freedoms by the US Department of State indicated that the Shia citizens constitute more than 60% of Bahraini population.
The book highlighted that the costs of housing requests made  by the politically naturalized citizens exceeds 2 billion and 289 million BD; which is equal to 6 billion and 70 million US dollars. Meanwhile, there are more than 53,000 housing requests at a rate of 4,000 annually. Shia are also deprived of taking charge of their religious endowments directorates (waqf), Shia athletes are persecuted and Shia students are also deprived of scholarships and educational rights. 33% of high-ranking students were deprived of scholarships.
Figures reveal that one third of the Northern Province (Shia villages) are still without drainage systems. The authorities did not commit to building 37% of the demolished mosques. Meanwhile, the violations in Ashura in 2015 reached 169. This, in addition to insulting the Shia sect and inciting hatred against its adherents during Friday sermons. The book also sheds light on the deliberate negligence and sabotage of the heritage and historic Shiite sites, not to mention the security forces' insults and abuses against Shia citizens in torture chambers.
The Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry highlighted the issues of inciting hatred, abuse of laws, discrimination against Shia, use of sectarian language and insults against detainees and religious figures, noting that many cases of torture and ill-treatment took place for the purpose of sectarian discrimination. Recommendation 1724 called on the authorities to take concrete measures to prevent incitement of violence and hatred.
The USCIRF had devoted a part of its 2013 annual report to Bahraini-related issues and severely criticised a number of cases. The report also documented media campaigns that used sectarian language against a certain sect of the society. Also, the US Department of State considered in its 2013 annual report that one of the major problems in Bahrain is discrimination against Shia citizens. For its part, the British Parliament expressed its concern regarding the ongoing media campaigns that foster sectarian hatred in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office 2012 report.

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Des ministres de la sous-région en consultation sur l’interdiction des Mutilations génitales féminines, Pana - 24 avril 2016
PANA, 24 Apr 2016


Dakar, Sénégal (PANA) – Les ministres de la Femme, de la Santé et de la Justice des Etats membres de la Communauté économique des Etats d’Afrique de l’Ouest (CEDEAO) et de la Mauritanie prennent part ce lundi à Dakar (Sénégal), à la Consultation sous-régionale sur l’application de la Résolution onusienne 69/150 interdisant les Mutilations génitales féminines (MGF).
Cette rencontre, qui vise à renforcer en particulier le cadre politique, législatif et juridique interdisant la pratique, se veut un moment-clé de la Campagne « BanFGM : Pour l’Elimination des Mutilations génitales féminines » dont le lancement effectif avait été effectué à Dakar en avril 2010.
Cette campagne financée par le ministère italien des Affaires étrangères et du Développement international, est menée par un groupe d’organisations de la société civile, composé de No Peace Without Justice (NPWJ), du Comité inter-africain sur les pratiques traditionnelles ayant effet sur la santé des femmes et des enfants (CI-AF) et des organisations nationales partenaires.
Aussi, la Consultation sous-régionale entend-elle harmoniser les législations nationales avec les conventions et traités internationaux ratifiés par la plupart des Etats de l’Afrique subsaharienne et renforcer l’engagement des acteurs impliqués à la mise en œuvre des dispositions de la Résolution 69/150.
Il faut rappeler qu’en 2012, l’assemblée générale des Nations unies avait adopté par consensus, la Résolution 67/146, qui sera renouvelée en 2014 et remplacée par la Résolution 69/150, interdisant les MGF de façon universelle.
« Aujourd’hui, un cadre législatif clair et efficient interdisant les MGF est désormais considéré comme un pilier incontournable dans la lutte contre cette violation des droits humains », affirme le ministère sénégalais de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfance, dans un communiqué qui met en exergue le « leadership très fort » du Sénégal dans le mouvement de promotion de l’abandon des pratiques néfastes.
Le communiqué de presse rapporte, à cet effet, « une réelle volonté politique marquée par un engagement au plus haut niveau de l’Etat sénégalais depuis les années 70 », précisant que l’année 1997 avait marqué un tournant décisif avec la prise de position publique du président d’alors, Abdou Diouf, condamnant la pratique des MGF, à l’occasion du congrès mondial des droits de l’homme, tenu à Dakar.
L’Assemblée nationale avait ensuite voté la loi 99-05 interdisant la pratique des MGF le 13 janvier 1999, sous l’impulsion du collectif des femmes parlementaires et des organisations de femmes.
Ces efforts en faveur de l’abandon des pratiques néfastes avaient conduit à l’élaboration de deux plans d’actions quinquennaux (2000-2005 et 2010-2015), « dont les exécutions ont permis d’enregistrer des progrès considérables », indique le communiqué qui invite tous les pays du monde entier à adopter des stratégies permettant de « pérenniser les acquis et de relever les défis pour le bonheur des femmes et des jeunes filles ».

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Consultation Ministérielle Sous Régionale sur la mise en œuvre de la Résolution onusienne 69/150 interdisant les Mutilations Génitales Féminines
Thiey Dakar, 23 Apr 2016


Un événement organisé par le Ministère de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfance du Sénégal, No Peace Without Justice, le Comité Inter-Africain sur les Pratiques Traditionnelles, La Palabre.
Pourquoi en 2016, le monde compte plus de 200 millions de filles et de femmes ayant subi les mutilations génitales féminines? Comment expliquer que cette forme de violence à l’égard des filles et des femmes, persiste toujours? Comment accepter que ces violations des droits humains continuent d’être perpétrées contre les femmes, sous-couvertes du respect de la tradition ou de la religion? Aujourd’hui, un cadre législatif clair et efficient interdisant les MGF est désormais considéré comme un pilier incontournable dans la lutte contre cette violation des droits humains.
Suite aux efforts des gouvernements et de la société civile, l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies a adopté par consensus, en 2012, la Résolution 67/146 (renouvelée en 2014 et remplacée par la 69/150) interdisant les MGF de façon universelle.
Depuis 2010, la Campagne « BanFGM : Pour l’Elimination des Mutilations Génitales Féminines » vise à contribuer à l’interdiction mondiale des MGF. La Campagne a vu son lancement effectif à Dakar en avril 2010 pendant la Conférence Interparlementaire, organisée en collaboration entre le Ministère de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfance, le Réseau des Parlementaires pour la Population et le Développement du Sénégal et NPWJ. Le Sénégal a donc, très tôt, eu un rôle central dans la poursuite de la Résolution onusienne, au niveau continental comme international.
La Campagne BanFGM, financée par le Ministère italien des Affaires étrangères et du développement international, est menée par un groupe d’organisations de la société civile, composé de No Peace Without Justice (NPWJ), du Comité Inter-Africain sur les Pratiques Traditionnelles ayant effet sur la Santé des Femmes et des Enfants (CI-AF) et des organisations nationales partenaires.
Le moment clé de cette campagne est l’organisation de cette Consultation Ministérielle Sous Régionale, les 26 et 27 avril 2016, à Dakar. Elle réunira les pays de la CEDEAO en plus de la Mauritanie, notamment les ministres de la Femme, de la Santé et de la Justice de la sous-région car étant les plus concernés par la question de l’application de la loi interdisant les MGF. Cette rencontre vise surtout à renforcer l’engagement des acteurs impliqués et en particulier le cadre politique, législatif et juridique interdisant la pratique, conformément aux dispositions de la Résolution 69/150, d’où l’urgence d’harmoniser la législation nationale conformément avec les conventions et traités internationaux ratifiés par la plupart des États des pays de l’Afrique Subsaharienne, dont le Sénégal.
Le choix de notre pays pour abriter cette rencontre s’explique par son leadership très fort dans le mouvement de promotion de l’abandon des pratiques néfastes. En effet, depuis les années 70, le gouvernement avait réaffirmé une réelle volonté politique par un engagement au plus haut niveau de l’Etat. L’année 1997 a marqué un tournant décisif avec la prise de position publique du président de la République, condamnant la pratique des MGF, à l’occasion du congrès mondial des droits de l’homme tenu à Dakar. En plus, le 13 janvier 1999, l’Assemblée Nationale avait voté, sous l’impulsion du collectif des femmes parlementaires et des organisations de femmes, la loi 99-05 interdisant la pratique des MGF. A cela s’ajoute l’élaboration de deux plans d’actions quinquennaux 2000-2005 et 2010-2015, dont les exécutions ont permis d’enregistrer des progrès considérables. Toutes ces raisons renforcent notre optimisme à penser que le Sénégal pourrait être le premier pays à atteindre l’objectif d’abandon total des MGF. Nous espérons que tous les pays du monde entier adopteront des stratégies leur permettant de pérenniser les acquis et de relever les défis pour le bonheur des femmes et des jeunes filles.

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Outrage at UN court's 'rewriting' of Balkans wars
Jo Biddle, AFP, 01 Apr 2016


Legal experts and historians have reacted with outrage to the controversial war crimes acquittal of firebrand Serb Vojislav Seselj, saying it overturns international law and rewrites the history of the Balkans conflict.
"The decision of the majority (judges) is divorced from the reality of what was happening in Croatia and Bosnia," former top US diplomat on war crimes issues, Stephen Rapp, told AFP. No stranger to complex cases, having led the prosecution of ex-Liberian president Charles Taylor, Rapp said he was very "disappointed" that Seselj was on Thursday found not guilty of nine charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity. The majority ruling by a three-judge panel at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) departed "from established law and accepted practises of fact-finding," said Rapp, now an expert with the Hague Global Institute for Justice, a think tank.
Seselj, once a firebrand paramilitary leader, had been charged with murder, persecution and torture of non-Serb civilians by being allegedly a member of a "joint criminal enterprise" along with the late Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic. But in essence, the judges found that Seselj was a politician who ardently supported his vision of a Greater Serbia, but was not a criminal.
The judges also tossed aside decades of international law by saying "the crimes happened in an atmosphere of war, and this justifies them," Balkans expert Eric Gordy told AFP. "This is simply in conflict with the law," added Gordy, a senior lecturer on Southeast European politics at University College London. Chief ICTY prosecutor Serge Brammertz is already studying the judgement to see if there are grounds for appeal, and said many of the judges' arguments were "absolutely not in line with the factual reality."
- 'No reasoning' -
Dissenting judge Flavia Lattanzi, in an unusually strong opinion, said her two colleagues had used "insufficient reasoning, or no reasoning at all" to support their acquittal of Seselj, "in contravention" of the court's rules. Read by French judge Jean-Claude Antonetti, the judgement acquitted Seselj of any wrongdoing during the period of the indictment between August 1991 and September 1993.
"The prosecution failed to prove beyond all reasonable doubt that there was a widespread and systematic attack against the non-Serb civilian population in large areas of Croatia and Bosnia-Hercegovina," Antonetti said. He specifically mentioned Vukovar, a Croatian town razed by Serb forces in November 1991, and Zvornik where some 40,000 non-Serb Bosnians were expelled by paramilitary groups in 1992. The judges could not rule out that the buses used to transport non-Serbs away from Serb-claimed territories "were in fact provided on humanitarian grounds," Antonetti said.
As for Seselj's inflammatory speeches such as urging Serb forces attacking Vukovar "to spare no one," he was "participating in the war effort by galvanising the Serb forces," the judges concluded.
The historical facts outlined by the judges "conflict with what the tribunal has found and what researchers and others know about what happened," said Gordy, the Balkans expert. He highlighted in particular the finding that there was no sustained attack on civilians in the Croatian town of Vukovar. "This is an impossible claim," said Gordy.
- 'Revisionism' -
Vukovar suffered a three-month long siege before being captured by Serb forces in November 1991. The hospital was heavily shelled throughout the siege, but stayed open, coping with desperate conditions including a lack of medicines, electricity, food and water. In late November 1991, Serb soldiers bused some 400 wounded Croats and other non-Serbs from the hospital to nearby Ovcara. Some 260 of them were taken to a secluded pig farm, where they were beaten, killed and buried in mass graves. Seselj was acquitted of murder as a war crime for the massacre committed by volunteers known as "Seselj's men" as the judges found he had no "hierarchical" responsibility for his militiamen.
"This kind of historical revision is quite simply unacceptable," said Niccolo Figa-Talamanca, head of the No Peace Without Justice non-governmental organisation. The judges had said "their role is not to establish the entire truth about the events that occurred; this may be true, but their role is equally not to deny the truth."
Noted author and Balkans expert, Jelena Subotic, writing for the EU-backed Balkans Transitional Justice initiative, denounced Thursday's verdict as "an embarrassment." "The Seselj verdict so fundamentally changes the interpretation of the character of the Yugoslav wars that it flips the main causal chain of events completely backwards," she said. 

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Syria event held on sidelines of human rights session
Gulf Times / QNA, 18 Mar 2016


Qatar’s permanent mission  to the UN Office in Geneva has organised a side event entitled, “Syria after five years in pursuit of democracy and accountability” at the 31st session of the Human Rights Council currently being held here.
The event was organised in co-operation with the permanent missions of Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Liechtenstein, the Netherlands, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the US along with “No Peace Without Justice” to the UN Office at Geneva.
A debate was the event’s main feature. The debate team members were Rami Nakhla , Syria project co-ordinator for No Peace Without Justice, Farah Atassi, president, National Syrian Women Association, Salma Jalkhi from Association of Women for Development and Fadel Abdulghani, director and founder of the Syrian Network for Human Rights (SNHR).
UK Special Representative for Syria Gareth Bayley and Muwafaq Nairabiye, vice-president of the National Coalition for Syrian Revolution and Opposition Forces, Michael Ratney, the US special envoy for Syria, were among the keynote participants. The event was co-managed by Hussein Sabbagh, secretary general of Euro-Syrian Democratic Forum and Niccolo Figa-Talamanca, secretary general of No Peace Without Justice.
It was attended by representatives of the member states of the UN Human Rights Council, Syrian non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and relevant international institutions.

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"Restoring faith in U.N.’s role"
By Jamal Mamo, Orient Net, 24 Feb 2016


U.N‘s role in resolving conflicts in the world has been jeopardized throughout the long five years of the Syrian crisis. Syrians have already lost their faith in the international community and its ability to stand firmly next to their just cause. However, there are still many Syrian activists and former international officials who are willing to give new hopes for Syrians who are eagerly fighting to make their voice heard.
In this context NPWJ Syria Program Coordinator Rami Nakhla held a panel discussion on February 22 to address the best course of practical action that needs to be taken by Syrian Civil Society Organizations and the International Community to restore the faith of Syrians in International Justice Mechanisms. The panel discussion takes place as a side event during the ongoing workshop “Promoting Accountability through UN Mechanisms with a focus on Women and Children” organized by NPWJ. The Panelists who participated in the panel discussion are: Flavia Pansieri: Former United Nations Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights; Jeremy Sarkin: Professor of Law at the University of South Africa (UNISA); Mustafa Haid: Syrian Activist and Dawlaty Chairperson.
One of the major drivers perpetuating the conflict in Syria is the sense of impunity for those committing crimes and human right violations, due in part to the paralysis of international justice mechanisms in holding perpetrators accountable. In turn, this fuels the feeling of a sense of abandonment by the Syrian people and promotes the idea that ‘Victors Justice’ is currently the only real option for Syria – repeating the cycle of revenge and violence. This has made reaching a political solution through negotiation next to impossible. In order to restore Syrians’ faith in international mechanisms to facilitate a political solution, we need first to restore their trust in the capabilities of international mechanism to facilitate justice for them.
The Former deputy high commissioner for Human Rights of the United Nations Flavia Pansieri said that the U.N as much as it is secretariat alone can’t find a political solution unless Security Council members cooperate for this goal. This is essential to deal with the current crisis. But concurrently while working for that solution there are many measures the U.N can and is already taking to address the problem in Syria. First, in terms of saving lives through humanitarian response. Second, through providing along with other partners capacity building to ensure that the ground is laid for whenever the current political crisis will be resolved to rebuild the institutions of the state on the basis of transparent, accountable and democratic principles. Third, documenting the grave violations of human rights that are going on to make sure that when the moment comes and it will come there will be accountability for what perpetrators have committed in terms of human rights violations. Professor Jeremy Sarkin said that U.N played an important role in implementing transitional justice in countries which have had wide-scale human violations. Despite being delayed due to political conflicts between U.N members, countries such as Angola, Liberia, Rwanda and Bosnia have managed to bring war criminals to justice.  Professor Sarkin advised Syrian activists not to lose hope and to keep documenting everything because documentation is their weapon to prove their just cause. Mustafa Haid commented on the main issue of the panel saying: “Syrian citizens are feeling let down and abandoned by the whole world. They are certainly feeling alone while facing the regime’s brutality.” Haid added that in order for Syrians to restore their faith in the U.N’s role and its mechanisms of implementing justice many tangible steps should be taken in this concern.
Syrians haven’t been going through hell by a brutal regime that has no equal in human history. They thought that the international community represented by the U.N. would definitely be on their just side.Their hopes and expectations weren’t met to the dismay of the international organization. However, they still count on the conscience of humanity to realize one day that they have a just cause and case. 

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Siria: approdano a Roma le foto di torture di “Caesar”
Alessandra Baldini, ONUITALIA, 12 Feb 2016


Dopo il Palazzo di Vetro e il parlamento Europeo le foto che denunciano atrocita’ commesse in Siria approdano a Roma dove potrebbero essere esposte in uno degli ambienti del Senato. Le immagini, una trentina, sarebbero state scattate da un ex fotografo della polizia militare siriana dal nome in codice Caesar.
Nei giorni scorsi, la presidente della Camera Laura Boldrini aveva rifiutato l’uso degli ambienti di Montecitorio per ospitare le foto anche perché giudicate “troppo efferate”
per le scolaresche spesso in visita ai Palazzi della politica. Ad offrire “ospitalità” alla mostra
fotografica è stato invece il presidente della Commissione per la Tutela dei diritti umani Luigi Manconi che ha assicurato il suo l’impegno e quello dell’organismo parlamentare da lui guidato per convincere i vertici di Palazzo Madama a dare tempi certi per la mostra.
Manconi ha assicurato che ndranno seguite tutte le regole in vigore al Senato adottando misure minime che consentano di rispettare la sensibilità di tutti, specie quella degli studenti più giovani in visita a Palazzo Madama, ma almeno “sarà possibile ospitare in una sede istituzionale questa straordinaria testimonianza contro la brutalità dei regimi dittatoriali”.
In attesa che si trovino le sale più idonee per accogliere le immagini dei “corpi degli oppositori di Assad, veri o presunti, torturati a morte nelle carceri siriane”, Sabrina Gasparrini che lavora per “Non c’è pace senza giustizia” spiega che in realtà gli scatti di Caesar “sono 55mila per un totale di 11.000 cadaveri”. L’ex fotografo della polizia siriana infatti “quando decise di lasciare il suo paese nel 2013 per denunciare al mondo le atrocità subite dal suo popolo portò via la pennetta Usb nella quale aveva raccolto tutto il suo lavoro di anni.

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Emma Bonino: «Le torture di Assad che Roma non vuole vedere»
di Lorenzo Cremonesi, nostro inviato a Gaziantep, Corriere della Sera, 11 Feb 2016


L’esponente radicale al confine turco-siriano: perché Camera e Senato non espongono quelle foto? Sono 53mila immagini che documentano gli orrori del regime di Damasco.
GAZIANTEP (Turchia) Quando hai il corpo impegnato nella lotta contro il tumore, come è il caso di Emma Bonino per sua stessa ammissione, dopo mesi e mesi di chemio nell’altalenarsi di crisi e speranze, ogni viaggio, ogni incontro, ogni discorso, diventano estremamente affaticanti. Il fisico si rifiuta, ci sono vertigini, un grande sonno, l’affievolirsi dei sensi. Anche soltanto leggere un breve documento può trasformarsi in una missione impossibile. Eppure, ieri mattina Emma appariva più combattiva che mai nel cercare di capire la situazione dei disperati che fuggono verso la Turchia dai bombardamenti in Siria. Capire e denunciare. «Possibile che noi europei si faccia così poco? Qui si sta consumando una tragedia terrificante», ci ha detto con la parlantina di sempre nella lobby del suo hotel con la valigia in mano. Un foulard discretamente avvolto sul capo a nascondere gli effetti collaterali delle cure. Gli occhi luccicanti di passione, dietro le lenti spesse. Più spesse di pochi mesi fa? O è forse un’impressione?
Posizione incomprensibile
Emma Bonino non le manda a dire. Hanno fatto molto rumore, dalla Turchia, le parole pronunciate in veste di membro della delegazione dell’European Council e di attivista-fondatrice dell’organizzazione non governativa «Non c’è Pace Senza Giustizia». «Da mesi vorremmo portare anche a Roma la ben nota sequenza di foto della cosiddetta Esposizione Caesar, che testimonia le terribili torture commesse in modo sistematico dal regime di Bashar Assad contro i detenuti in carcere. Ma sia il Senato che la Camera l’hanno rifiutata, vuoi per motivi di opportunità politica, vuoi perché considerate troppo crude», spiega. Emma ha uno scatto. «Mi sembra una posizione incomprensibile. E’ dal 2013 che quelle oltre 53.000 immagini che documentano le sofferenze di quasi 7.000 prigionieri fanno il giro del mondo. Sono state nei corridoi delle Nazioni Unite, nelle maggiori università americane e inglesi, al parlamento di Londra, a Bruxelles. Come è concepibile che invece noi italiani le si abbia rifiutate? Per Laura Boldrini non possono essere esposte alla Camera, offendono le nostre sensibilità. Ma sono vere, sono lo specchio di eventi reali. Se andiamo avanti a edulcorare i fatti in questo modo finiremo per creare nuove generazioni incapaci di confrontarsi con la durezza dell’universo che ci circonda».
Scuole e ospedali nel mirino
Il tema è indubbiamente all’ordine del giorno. «Gli osservatori che lavorano in Siria, e riportano anche alla nostra organizzazione, raccontano degli effetti terrificanti dei bombardamenti russi sulla popolazione civile. Ci sono voci di massacri da parte delle truppe lealiste e delle milizie sciite>, continua l’esponente radicale. Le fanno eco i rappresentanti della sua organizzazione qui a Gaziantep. «Abbiamo testimonianze di scuole, cliniche e ospedali colpiti in modo ripetuto a nord di Aleppo. Nella cittadina di Azaz in meno di 24 ore sono stati presi di mira almeno cinque ospedali. I profughi scappano nel timore di massacri da parte dei fedelissimi di Bashar.
Un fenomeno nuovo vede molti civili delle zone sunnite dove prima operavano le milizie ribelli che, di fronte alla chiusura dei confini turchi, scelgono di scappare nelle zone controllate da Isis, piuttosto che subire le vendette delle squadracce legate al regime di Damasco», sostiene Rami Nakhla, esponente locale di «Non c’è Pace Senza Giustizia». Incontrando ad Ankara il premier Ahmet Davutoglu, la delegazione europea si è sentita ripetere le ragioni del permanere della chiusura della frontiera, che comunque per le autorità turche resta «formalmente aperta». Dal confine con la Siria non lontano da Gaziantep gli aiuti umanitari affluiscono al campo di tende approntato a pochi metri dal filo spinato, in territorio siriano. E i casi di feriti più gravi hanno accesso agli ospedali turchi. Ma resta il timore che l’esodo sia solo agli inizi.

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AAS-Iraq receives a delegation from the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization and No Peace Without Justice
Assyrian Aid Iraq, 10 Feb 2016


President of Assyrian Aid Society-Iraq Mr. Ashur Eskrya, at the AASI's headquarters in Dohuk, on Wednesday Feb. 10th 2016, received a delegation included Ms. Johanna Green, program manager at Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization and Mr. Alessandro Manno from No Peace Without Justice, with the  attendance of body Administrative of AASI.
The AASI President talked with visitors about the conditions of indigenous peoples and minorities in Iraq after the occupation of Daash (ISIS) to their areas, especially the conditions of our People, where he explained the difficult humanitarian situation of  IDP's in areas where they currently living in, the need to find solutions or to address the situation, and the returning of displaced people to their areas and guarantees in returning the minorities to peaceful coexistence in their areas of origin, Mr. Ashur also talked about the role of our Society during the previous period in providing assistance to support IDP's, in attempts to reduce their suffer by providing the shelter and relief.

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